Posts Tagged ‘Alzheimer’s Association’

Healthy Living Tips

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Janet Syvertsen from Alzheimer’s Association is at The Birches at Esopus today. She is joined by a group of residents for a lunchtime presentation: “Healthy Habits for your brain and body: tips from the latest research. The workshop covered lifestyle habits associated with healthy aging: cognitive activity, exercise, diet & nutrition, and social engagement. Of particular interest was the Mediterranean diet as a few residents shared some menu ideas and diet successes.


Alzheimer’s Association Presentation

Monday, November 7th, 2016

 

Janet Syvertsen from the Alzheimer’s Association Hudson Valley Chapter gave a wonderful and informative presentation today to our residents about knowing the 10 early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s.The ten signs and symptoms:

  1. Memory loss,
  2. challenges in planning or solving problems,
  3. difficulty completing familiar tasks,
  4. confusion with time or place,
  5. trouble understanding visual images,
  6. new problems with words or speaking,
  7.  misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps,
  8. decreased or poor judgement,
  9. withdrawal from work or social activities, and
  10. changes in mood and personality.

For more information about the ten signs visit http://www.alz.org/10-signs-symptoms-alzheimers-dementia.asp.

And don’t forget to visit and like us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/TheBirchesatChambers/

 


A senior moment or . . . what was the word? Alzheimer’s

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

Town of Ulster, August 22, 2011  Wendy K. Rudder, LCSW and Care Consultant for the Alzheimer’s Association presented the basics of the disease to some fifty senior residents of The Birches at Chambers and Chambers Court who gathered today in the Community Room at The Birches at Chambers. This  is the latest affordable senior community developed and managed by Birchez Associates. Ms. Rudder had been invited to speak through the efforts of Senior Advocate for Birches Associates, Alice Tipp.

Alzheimer’s Disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that affects memory, behavior, personality and muscle control. And the numbers are startling: While Alzheimer’s generally affects people 65 or older, a quarter of a million under 65 have the disease. Over the age of 65, one out of eight people has the disease. The likelihood of developing the disease doubles every five years after age 65 so that 49% of those 85 and over have Alzheimer’s — nearly one in two people.

Already more than 5 million Americans live with Alzheimer’s and yet the Baby Boomers are just crossing the age 65 threshold. It is estimated that without a cure, Alzheimer’s will move up from the #7 cause of death among adults to number one by the middle of this century.

Ms. Rudder shared the 10 Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease with her audience, careful to explain that just forgetting where you put the keys last night or temporarily forgetting someone’s name or a movie title you saw two weeks ago are probably more senior moments than symptoms of the disease. www.alz.org gives some good examples of the difference between senior moments and symptoms under “Know the Ten Signs”. The 10 Symptoms are:

  • Memory loss that affects everyday living
  • Challenges in planning or solving problems
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks
  • Confusion with time or place (even familiar places)
  • Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing
  • Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps
  • Decreased or poor judgment
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities (initiative)
  • Changes in mood or behavior.

Wendy suggested that the above symptoms may merit a visit to a neurologist. And she stressed that one or two of the symptoms by themselves may not mean an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Sometimes the combination of medications, or the body’s inability to absorb B12 is enough to mimic these symptoms.

The Alzheimer’s Association can help in many ways including education, referrals  and caregiver groups. Their helpline and website is www.alz.org. The Hudson Valley/Rockland/Westchester, NY Chapter is housed in Poughkeepsie. If you are calling from Ulster County, use 845-340-8474. The Walk to End Alzheimer’s raises funds for global research and to provide support services locally. In this area the Walks to End Alzheimer’s will be Saturday, October 15th in Poughkeepsie and Saturday, October 22nd in Stone Ridge. To sign up, www.alz.org/hudsonvalley or call 1.800.272.3900.